Winter’s Coming..

Winter is coming… but don’t worry we’ve got you covered!
This is the ideal time to dress your windows ready for the winter months ahead!

Over the last year we have written a few blogs around the advantages of having Curtains, Blinds and Shutters, but we have mainly focussed on the customisable aspect!

But for this blog I wanted to focus on the best types of window dressing for the winter, so let’s get stuck in.

- CURTAINS -

Made to Measure Eyelet Curtains

When it comes to Curtains we would suggest that you either have thermal lining or that you have interlined curtains.

When paired with a heavy fabric, you will be sure to keep out any drafts!

Floor Length Curtains are particularly effective on Doors and Tall Windows, and can be removed once the warmer months come around!

 

- BLINDS -
Made to Measure Roman Blinds

The most effective blinds to keep the cold out and the heat in are Roman Blinds. Similarly to Curtains, we would also suggest having thermal lining or having your Roman Blinds interlined.

Romans can fit very snugly to your window, which makes them great if you have radiators under your window.

 

- SHUTTERS -
Shutters

When it comes to Shutters for Winter, we would suggest Full Height and Tier on Tier Shutters. They are fitted perfectly to your window frame, and so when closed, they’re great for keeping out unwelcome drafts.

Shutters create an air gap similar to that which double glazed windows do, which is great for eliminating any heat loss.

 

I hope this has helped you with choosing the best winter window dressing for your home. If you do have any questions about these window treatments, leave us a message in the comments, and we’ll see if we can help you!

Rug Rules: Part 2

In Part 1 of Rug Rules, we covered positioning and sizes of rugs in the living room. Part 2 of our ‘Rug Rules’ series will be covering some useful tips that a lot of designers are using in bedrooms and dining rooms.

This guide has pulled together a lot of clever ‘rug rules’ we have come across over the years that help give your living rooms that expensive and finished look. If you haven’t already bought a rug, these tips will help you decide on what size rug you need.

 

Bedroom (18 inch rule)

- Around the Bed -

To help balance out an area rug which is placed under a bed, it must be large enough to extend on both sides of the bed. The general rule which is used, is that the rug should extend at least 18 inches (which is roughly 45cm for us Brits) either side. The same rule applies whether it is a large rug, or a rug just at the foot of the bed.

 

 

- From the Walls - 

For a smaller room, this tip may work better for you. By placing just the front legs of your furniture onto your rug, it will give the room a good sense of proportion. This option is also practical, the furniture will still keep the rug in place.

 

 

Dining Room (24 inch rule)

- Around the Table -

The rules change slightly when it comes to the dining room. It is suggested that there is at least 24 inches (around 60cm) around the whole dining table to allow space to move your chairs without the back legs coming off the rug. It is also more pleasing to the eye when you have a rug the same shape as your dining table.

 

That’s us done on rug rules for now. We hope that you feel more confident for when you buy your next rug! If you are having any troubles with your furniture layouts and rugs, leave us a message in the comments, and we’ll see if we can help you!

Rug Rules: Part 1

Are you looking to buy a new rug or unsure how you should be making the most of the rug you have? Keep reading Part 1 of ‘Rug Rules’ to learn some useful tips that a lot of designers are using in living rooms.

This guide has pulled together a lot of clever ‘rug rules’ we have come across over the years that help give your living rooms that expensive and finished look. If you haven’t already bought a rug, these tips will help you decide on what size rug you need.

 

Living Room (Placement of Legs)

THE DO'S

- All on -

It generally looks very smart if all your furniture legs (sofas, chairs, side tables) are all on the rug. This is
not only visually great, but it is also a practical option, as the furniture weighs the rug down, keeping it in place. This tip works the best in a particularly large room.

 

 

- Front on, back off - 

For a smaller room, this tip may work better for you. By placing just the front legs of your furniture onto your rug, it will give the room a good sense of proportion. This option is also practical, the furniture will still keep the rug in place.

 

 

THE DON'TS

- None on -
This is a controversial point. It is rare that this one works well within a design, and is often where people go wrong with their rugs. Rugs without any furniture on it generally looks awkward, as if it is floating in the room, and also the rug is very likely to move as people walk on it.

 

 

Hopefully, you will have learnt something new about furniture positioning, if you are having any troubles with your furniture layouts and rugs, leave us a message in the comments, and we’ll see if we can help you!

In Part 2 we will be covering ‘Rug Rules’ in your Bedrooms and Dining Rooms.

How to make the most of your space

There are many methods designers adopt to help clients achieve the most
out of their spaces, here’s a couple of our tricks..

 

1. PLAN, PLAN AND PLAN SOME MOREEmpty Floorplan

Planning sounds boring and time consuming, but it’ll save a lot of hassle later on.

Spatial planning is so important to making the most out of the space you have, the easiest method in doing this in with a floor plan.
A floor plan is a bird’s eye view of your space; it’s very easy to do one of these, just pop out a tape measure and get drawing. It’s very important that floor plans are drawn to scale in order for it to be an accurate representation of your space.
Floor plans not only help us visualise the space better, but they are a great visual tool for us to communicate our ideas with our clients. Once the floor plans are drawn, we can then go ahead and source the furniture and arrange it within this space.

 

 

Floorplan with Furniture and Circulation2. SMART SOURCING

Because we all know someone who bought furniture that didn’t fit through the door!

Having the wrong sized furniture will have a terrible visual impact on your room. You may have found the most beautiful sofa ever, and then when you come to put it in the space, it just overpowers the room, and then you’re either stuck with a beautiful but large sofa, or you have to deal with the hassle of returning it and go back to the drawing board.
When we find the furniture we’re going to source, we measure them up and draw them into our plan to ensure that it will all fit and that the layout will work for our clients’ needs.
The arrangement of your furniture also has an enormous impact on your space, it influences how people experience it and what path they with walk along. You may have realised that IKEA have masterfully planned their stores to make you walk the whole way around it so that you see everything. There is power in planning.

 

3. IT PAYS TO BE ORGANISEDExample of bad planning and good planning

Quite literally, it could save you money in future.

When you are in the first stages of your design, electrical points, such as the location of a plug socket need to be factored in, that way you can make sure they are concealed and won’t ruin your final design.
This is also a problem in the kitchen where appliances aren’t in a convenient location due to the plug sockets limiting our freedom. Or our phones won’t reach the bedside table because the cables are so far away. Factoring the location of electrical items in the early stages of planning and design really will make your life much easier.

 

Spatial planning impacts the way we live every day, and if it is done well, it can really enhance your life

and help make the most out of your existing spaces.

We hope you enjoyed reading; “How to make the most of your space”
If you would like to arrange a FREE Consultation, please contact us 
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